Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Francois Teyssier » Wed Jul 08, 2020 5:10 pm

Dear All,

Joroslav Merc, Rudolf Gàlis and M. Wolf have opened a new Database of Symbiotic stars
Merc, J., Gális, R., Wolf, M. (2019), First release of the New Online Database of Symbiotic Variables, Research Notes of the AAS, 3, 28, 2019RNAAS…3b..28M
Among them, some objects require additional information in order to check the classification.

Jaroslav requests spectra of the following objects:

PN K 1-6: Interesting planetary nebula, with the variable central star. A possible symbiotic binary in a center. The object was analyzed in this work: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/?#abs/2011PASA...28...83F, however, they had no spectra at the disposal. They actually rejected the symbiotic classification, however, they admitted that they do not have spectra to confirm it. It is quite a bright object in Draco, well observable in this period of time.

V379 Peg: Symbiotic candidate or a cataclysmic variable. However, there is confusion in the literature, which object is really the one observed in an outburst in the eighties. See the discussion here: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003IBVS.5368....1H/abstract. No spectra are available. Most databases point to the red object (e.g. SIMBAD). SIMBAD even classifies the star as confirmed symbiotic binary. However, object in outburst was maybe the blue object with magnitude >18mag. At least you can try to acquire the spectrum of the red star. It is observable in the second half of the night.

V1017 Cyg: Symbiotic star according to https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/?#abs/2007A%26A...469..799S, however, no spectrum. In Cygnus, it should be high in the sky, but a fainter one.

I have two for the southern observers in my high-priority list, both observable very well now from the southern hemisphere.
EC 19249-7343, symbiotic star candidate (https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/?#abs/2013MNRAS.431..240O),
Another very interesting object, although faint (maybe approx 15 mag), Hen 3-860. Very interesting photometric behavior in 2018-2019. Good quality low-res spectrum could be very potential for a publication.



Send spectra to francoismathieu.teyssier at bbox.fr for inclusion in the database
Francois Teyssier
 
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Re: Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Jaroslav Merc » Thu Jul 09, 2020 6:29 pm

Hi everyone,

I hope that you are doing well during these difficult times.

Francois, thank you very much for posting my request. :)

I am working on the New Online Database of Symbiotic Variables (http://astronomy.science.upjs.sk/symbiotics/), which have already been presented here some time ago. As the latest catalog by Belczynski et al. (2000) is already 20 years old (and Akras et al., 2019 presented only a list of objects with IR information/temperatures and not full catalog), it is needed to have a replacement, which would be suitable for studies of the symbiotic population (in the Milky Way and beyond). Many new objects have been discovered in the last two decades and several candidates appeared as well. The extragalactic part of the database is already finished and I am now working on the galactic part, which is also more interesting for you.

The first goal was to collect all objects, which were mentioned as confirmed or possible symbiotics in the published literature. The lists are already provided on the website. Now I am collecting all the available information from the literature for these objects. In this way, we will be able to identify objects that are not sufficiently characterized, e.g. for which spectra are completely missing.

Another subgoal is, to identify the misclassified objects - the objects, which were supposed to be symbiotic stars (or candidates) in the published papers, but are not. Unfortunately, there are several of these included in various astronomical databases (SIMBAD, GCVS, etc.) and consequently in the lists of symbiotics used in the research... I have prepared various ways to identify such disputable objects in the Database. For their reclassification, the spectroscopic information is desirable.

From the list, which Francois already posted, most of the objects are probably not symbiotic stars, however as no spectra have been obtained, we cannot draw a final conclusion. On the other hand, PN K 1-6 is a bonafide planetary nebula, but the nature of the central star is unknown and very interesting, it is definitely pulsating. V1017 Cyg pulsates as well and is classified as a bonafide symbiotic star. For now, ONE spectrum of each object would be enough. We will decide based on the output if another follow-up would be needed.

Hen 3-860, available for the southern observers, increased its brightness in 2018 - 2019 and many clues indicate it is a symbiotic star! I have already started to analyze available photometry, and it looks like, that there might have been other outbursts in the past. The spectrum is now very welcomed.

Every observer would be included as a co-author of the publication/publications that will emerge from this research. For now, the plan is to summarize the misclassified objects in one paper. We will devote a separate one to Hen 3-860.

I will be happy to update the list of objects soon. The database will be updated in the coming weeks, for now, I have finished the work on about 200 from 400 galactic objects. Many of these are very interesting but poorly studied. Looking forward to our collaboration!
Jaroslav Merc
 
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Re: Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Forrest Sims » Thu Jul 09, 2020 10:23 pm

Hi Jaroslav, François, Everyone,

I had a go at PN K 1-6 last night and here is what I got with (9) 600sec exposures. The data has been submitted to François for the database.

Cheers
Woody Sims
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pnk1-6_20200709_272_Forrest Sims annotated.png
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Re: Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Christian Buil » Fri Jul 10, 2020 11:45 pm

Hi, a sequence of UVEX spectra of the proposed objects :

PN K 1-6 - Clearly not a symbiotic star. Halpha line is in small emission, confirmed on two independent observations on two successive night (the spectrum given is the sum of the two night) :

Image

(instructive to compare to sims's spectrum - for the UVEX configuration used, lower resolution but better SNR).

V1017 Cyg - Not a symbiotic, but the Signal to Noise Ratio is not very hight (a faint object, near V=12.6) :

Image

V379 Peg - Possible symbiotic star (a more exposure time is mandatory) :

Image

And also some classical symbiotic,

CI Cyg (note the clear detection of [Ne V] line at 3345 A, and also some significant change compared to UVEX 2018 spectra of the objet, for example increase emission of [Fe VIII] line at 3586 A :

Image

Image

Z And :

Image

Image

I submitted to François.

Christian Buil
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Re: Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Jaroslav Merc » Sat Jul 11, 2020 3:15 pm

Hi again,

Woody and Christian, thank you very much for your great work!
I have analyzed your observations, together with available photometric and spectrophotometric data, and here are my (preliminary) results:


V1017 Cyg: G0-2V, this is more or less consistent with the absolute magnitude calculated using the distance of 1100pc from Gaia. Variability with a period of 0.33 days. Although proposed as a symbiotic binary or RR Lyr, this would be rather a W UMa binary (subtype W).

V379 Peg: Although the spectrum has a low signal to noise, it is similar to M2-4V. Luminosity class is confirmed by the photometry assuming the star is located in the distance of 107pc as given by Gaia. Therefore it is rather a dwarf star then a symbiotic binary. Spectrum with a higher signal to noise may reveal some emission lines due to the chromospheric activity of the star.

PN K 1-6: Confirmed not to be a symbiotic star by spectroscopic observations, however, the real nature is still puzzling. Spectrum (and brightness assuming the distance 268pc from Gaia) is consistent with K2V star with some excess in the blue region, consistent with the blackbody with a temperature of few tens of thousands K. Object was confirmed to be a PN, so hot pre-WD or WD is expected, several PNe has binary central stars. However, there is a ~21 days variability in the light curves which would rather point to pulsations of a giant star. Moreover, there is another, fainter star in the vicinity of PN K 1-6 with the very same distance and same proper motions, which would suggest that these stars are physically connected... Although it is not a symbiotic star, this object deserves further attention. The curve of radial velocities would be helpful, but I am afraid that the object is too faint for higher resolution monitoring.



Here is the next list of objects needing spectra:

V503 Her (V~12.5): No spectrum available in the literature, suspected in Kenyon (1986). Probably it is an eclipsing system (Gromadzki et al., 2013, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2013AcA....63..405G/abstract).

V1988 Sgr (V~12.5): Similar case to the previous one, no spectrum, suspected in Kenyon's book. Confirmed in SIMBAD, ZAND: in GCVS. Might have been detected in outburst (Hoffleit, 1962, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/1962AJ.....67..228H/abstract).

V2204 Oph (V~14.3): Listed as a confirmed symbiotic star in SIMBAD, as ZAND: in GCVS, however, no spectrum is available in the literature. Probably have been observed in outburst by Samus (1983, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/1983MitVS...9...87S/abstract), however, I have not yet been able to recover the paper from some library...

ASAS J174600-2321.3 (Sgr, V~13.0): An extremely promising candidate for symbiotic nova, long-lasting outburst, eclipsing system (Hümmerich et al., 2015, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2015JAVSO..43...14H/abstract). Should be monitored if the spectrum will start to appear "symbiotic" (see figure 6.5 in Munari, 2019, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2019arXiv190901389M/abstract).

V5590 Sgr (V~13.0): Same case as the previous one, probably a symbiotic nova, detected in prolonged outburst by Nakano et al. (2012, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2012CBET.3140....1N/abstract). The progenitor is a Mira variable (Mroz et al., 2014, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2014MNRAS.443..784M/abstract).

2MASS J01093484-0800329 (Cet, V~15.1): Last from the list of symbiotic novae candidates (Honeycutt & Kafka, 2010, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2010AJ....139.2706H/abstract). This one for southern observers.

V562 Lyr (V~11.7): Suspected based on the photometric variability by Guilbault et al. (2000, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2000IBVS.4926....1G/abstract). No spectrum is available.

HH Sge (V~11.8): Mentioned as a symbiotic nova in the conclusion section of the paper by Yudin (1987 https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/1987 ... Y/abstract). This was probably a mistyping of HM Sge. On the other hand, the star is classified as a long-period variable, so just to be sure, the non-symbiotic nature of the star should be confirmed with the spectrum.

V618 Sgr (V~15.3): Rather faint candidate. Suspected by Kilkenny (1989, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/1989Obs...109..229K/abstract). Unfortunately, there is no spectrum covering the red region, Kilkenny presented only 3500 - 5500A showing several emission lines.

IRAS 19050+0001 (Aql, V~15.0): Another relatively faint object in V, however, it is highly reddened and is extremely bright in the red region and especially in IR. Databases as SIMBAD gives NSV 11749 at this position, which is known as symbiotic binary. This object also appears on the list by Akras et al. (2019). However, NSV 11749 is probably another object, so there is basically no spectroscopic information on IRAS 19050+0001 in the literature.

Hen 4-204 (Gru, V~9.7): A bright target for southern observers, which might be a yellow symbiotic star (Vanture & Wallerstein, 2003, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2003PASP..115.1367V/abstract).

Please, do not forget about the previous two southern targets (Hen 3-860 - high priority and EC 19249-7343).

Have a clear sky!
Jaroslav Merc
 
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Re: Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Terry Bohlsen » Mon Jul 13, 2020 10:56 am

I will hopefully be able to obtain spectra of the 2 southern stars but the weather needs to improve first. :D
Terry
Terry Bohlsen
Armidale NSW
Australia
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Re: Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Ibrahima » Mon Jul 13, 2020 12:42 pm

Hi.

Here is a spectrum of HH Sge and of V562 Lyr. HH Sge looks like a type K star. V562 Lyr also should not be a symbiotic star.

hhsge_20200712_968_Ibrahima_red.png
hhsge_20200712_968_Ibrahima_red.png (57.53 KiB) Viewed 828 times


v562lyr_20200711_957_Ibrahima_red.png
v562lyr_20200711_957_Ibrahima_red.png (61.89 KiB) Viewed 828 times


Best regards,
Ibrahima.
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Re: Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Peter Velez » Mon Jul 13, 2020 1:04 pm

Terry Bohlsen wrote:I will hopefully be able to obtain spectra of the 2 southern stars but the weather needs to improve first. :D
Terry


Terry - I'm with you. The weather has been dreadful. Hopefully Wednesday or Thursday this week

Pete
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Re: Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Francois Teyssier » Mon Jul 13, 2020 6:21 pm

Hi All,

Great reactivity and results on faint targets.
New page in the database :http://www.astrosurf.com/aras/Aras_DataBase/Symbiotics/Classification.htm

To Jaroslav
Thank you so much for the analysis of the spectra.
A few spectra of V503 Her are in the database:http://www.astrosurf.com/aras/Aras_DataBase/Symbiotics/V503Her.htm
(Two of them show a different continuum .
No signature of symbiotic phenomenon in the visible range.

All the best,

François
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Re: Suspected/Misclassified Symbiotics: spectra required

Postby Peter Velez » Sun Jul 19, 2020 4:50 am

Here are my spectra for southern targets Hen 4-204 and EC 19249-7343.

Please treat these as provisional - I had limited time last night and want to check that I imaged the correct stars.

Balmer emissions are very modest, if present at all, in both stars. Emissions are most pronounced for H gamma.

Francois, I have corrected these for HRV (determined in ISIS when processed) and V reported in Simbad. Do you want the spectra provided with or without these adjustments?

Pete
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